October 18, 2019

Pharmacovigilance Best Practices: Establishing a Foundation of Drug Safety Success

Thanks to everyone on the great feedback we have received on this blog series focused on pharmacovigilance best practices for clinical and early post-approval biopharma companies. We've discussed discussed the importance of understanding reporting and submission to FDA, taking control of your pharmacovigilance software and creating a shared services model with your CRO.

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October 11, 2019

Pharmacovigilance Best Practice #3: Use Software to Create a Shared Services Model with Your CRO

Last week's blog post discussed the importance of taking control of your pharmacovigilance software. This week we discuss Best Practice #3: Using software to create a shared services model with your CRO.

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October 4, 2019

Pharmacovigilance Best Practice #2: Take Control of Your Software

Last week's blog post discussed the importance of understanding what adverse events are reportable to FDA and how they are submitted. This week we discuss Best Practice #2: Take control of your software. 

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September 27, 2019

Pharmacovigilance Best Practice #1: Understand FDA adverse event reporting requirements

Last week's blog post introduced our new pharmacovigilance "best practices" series that we have put forward for clinical and early stage biopharma companies. This week we discuss Best Practice #1: Understand what is reportable and know how reports are submitted to FDA. 

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October 6, 2017

FAERS Thee Well - Drug Safety Excitement with FDA Dashboard

It’s been an exciting week in the normally staid world of drug safety.  

Last Thursday, FDA launched a public dashboard for FAERS (the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System).  We’ve been calling on FDA to do this for years, so we were quite excited to read the news and take the new dashboard out for a spin.

Apparently, a lot of others were just as excited.  The site almost immediately stopped working and stayed that way for most of Friday. 

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August 4, 2017

What happens when a Safety Signal contradicts Clinical Trial data?

Last month, FDA released their quarterly watch list of ongoing drug safety concerns. My colleague Jim wrote a blog post on some of the major talking points around the update, not on the drugs or the risks themselves, but general pharmacovigilance themes. Our post this week focuses on one of the risks that was specifically discussed by FDA on the SGLT-2 class of diabetes drugs. The SGLT-2's had triggered a safety signal for nephrolithiasis (aka kidney stones). Evidex RxSignal analysis had also predicted this safety signal for most of these SGLT-2 drugs, with many of the signals being triggered more than a year prior to this alert.

However, unlike the 12 other safety issues in this same alert, the FDA quickly determined that despite the safety signal shown in the postmarketing data, “no action is necessary at this time, based on available information”. In other words, the FDA does not believe that kidney stones should be disclosed as a risk to the labels of these medications.

Why did the FDA make this determination so quickly? What information did the FDA use?

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July 21, 2017

FDA Releases Q1 2017 Drug Safety Watch List: It’s Boring and That’s Good

Earlier this month FDA quietly published a quarterly update to their publicly available “watch list” of ongoing drug safety concerns. The updates are based on Q1 2017 FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data. You can download a copy of our recent Evidex Alert, covering the new additions, clarifications, and “all clears” so I won’t get into the details in this post. However, it is worth noting that there were fourteen unique drugs, or in some cases entire classes of drugs, that were included in the update. Many of the drugs have been on market for quite a long time and otherwise would be considered to have a well established safety profile. For 8 of the 11 alerts that could be signaled for (3 of the alerts were AEs that were already labeled for), Advera Health’s RxSignal early warning system did its job and picked up on the signal. The remaining alerts either weren't on a RxSignal eligible adverse event, meaning it wasn't a serious event that the FDA typical takes action on, but there was noticable elevated reporting as defined by reporting odds ratios (ROR). 

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July 14, 2017

Canada’s March Toward Mandatory Reporting of Adverse Events by Providers

Canada has long had a more open system for reporting and searching adverse drug events.  They provide an easy to use online form for healthcare providers and consumers to make direct reports, which contrasts significantly to the cumbersome reporting form provided by FDA here in the U.S.   They provide a web-based search tool that enables anyone to search through adverse event reports submitted to Health Canada.  Nothing like that exists from FDA in the U.S.

Now comes word that Canada is taking a step toward something that we’ve long believed to be a crucial factor in improving and increasing adverse event reporting – requiring reporting from healthcare providers. 

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March 11, 2016

A Crystal Ball for FDA Action: How we Validated RxSignal

We are pleased to report that our latest major publication, “A Pharmacovigilance Signaling System Based on FDA Regulatory Action and Post-Marketing Adverse Event Reports” was released this week in the esteemed journal “Drug Safety.”  It was published as an online-first feature and will also appear in the April copy of the print version of Drug Safety.

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March 28, 2014

FDA Releases Updated Drug Safety Data – Announces OpenFDA… Now hold your applause


Creating actionable analytics around the big data set provided through the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is the backbone of the AdverseEvents Explorer software. Given the infrequency of releases in 2013, you can imagine how excited we were when we heard the news that Q1 2013 data were finally posted for download. While probably not surprising, self-described data geeks do get excited about data.

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